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the Kelpies go Supernova !

the Kelpies HDR print

A unique night-time race around the Kelpies is being held .
The 5k run is the first event of its kind in Scotland.
The run takes place at dusk on November 7 and it will allow participants to explore the home of the two 30-metre high horses at their best – lit up in their dark surroundings.
LED head torches and glow-sticks will make the 5k run a unique experience , immersing the runners in fantastic voyage around the 300 tonne statues.
The Supernova event is a 5K with a twist, with friends and family kitted out in anything that glows in the dark and creating a magical experience of light and sound.
Visitors to the Kelpies know that they look absolutely spectacular – especially when they’re all lit up at night .
The event is open for both experienced runners and friends and families wanting a stroll – with fancy dress strongly encouraged.

the Kelpies HDR print now for sale online. The Kelpies gifts shop is open featuring prints , tshirts and Kelpies postcards.

Picture by Photogold photography

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Peter Blake supports Hogarth statue renovation

The  restoration of the  statue of William Hogarth in Chiswick to its former glory has begun. The works will be paid for by section 106 funding after lobbing by Chiswick Councillors. Situated in front of Barclay’s Bank on the High Road, the statue of Chiswick’s most famous former resident and “founder of English painting” was first unveiled in 2001 by Ian Hislop and David Hockney. Also present was local resident Peter Blake bringing arguably Britain’s two greatest living artists to honour one of the country’s all-time greats.
Since the unveiling members of the William Hogarth Trust have commemorated the artist’s birthday by placing flowers there each year.
In November 2006, broadcaster Kirsty Young unveiled a new information panel next to the statue on what would have been Hogarth’s 309th birthday. Peter Blake is often called the grandfather of pop art . In the 60s he became famous as the designer of the cover of the Beatles’ Sergeant Pepper album . He has continued working up until the present day. His most recent works include the Venice Suite and box sets of the  ‘world series’, ‘Paris Suite‘ & ‘Butterflyman, homage to Damien Hirst’.
Blake continues on his tour of the great cities of the world, following his Venice Suite of 2009, and has now brought his unique vision to the City of Light in the Paris Suite. This beautifully presented portfolio set is comprised of twenty original silkscreen prints on paper. Once again Blake has taken inspiration from an antique souvenir postcard set of the city, using these as the basis for each packed collage composition. Blake creates hugely complex and humorous scenarios filled by characters and objects found in his personal collection of printed materials. The series contains several classic Blake motifs such as the circus, magic crowds, dancing and butterflies, and showcases the sophistry of his compositional skills. Blake’s careful balance and soft application of colour throughout the series, render the works reminiscent of old-fashioned aquatints; they could almost be illustrations to a story book from yesteryear- he leaves it to the viewer to create the story. Collage has been a medium that has fascinated Blake since his first experiments at the Royal College of Art in 1955. He took inspiration from artists such as Kurt Schwitters and Max Ernst to create collages that were surreal and comic visual stories bringing together many disparate and strange elements.

Paris Suite comprises: Paris- 10 Man Upright, Paris-Aquarium, Paris- Butterflies I, Paris- Butterflies II, Paris- Charabanc Outing, Paris- Chicken Art, Paris- Circus I, Paris- Circus II, Paris- Confucius, Paris- Dancing, Paris- Elephants, Paris- Girl, Paris- Lowering Elephants, Paris- Men with their Pets, Paris- Monkeys, Paris- The Day the Apes Escaped, Paris- The Day the Seine Froze Over, Paris- The Kiss, Paris- Women with their Pets, Paris- Working Elephants and is presented in a museum quality binding-box. Each artwork is a signed limited edition silkscreen print on paper with glazes.

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Still Life with Coffee Pot set to beat The Singing Butler’s price at auction

The Singing Butler by Jack Vettriano
The Singing Butler by Jack Vettriano

In 2004 Jack Vettriano’s painting of The Singing Butler set a record price for a Scottish painting. It sold for £744,500. Samuel Peploe’s Still Life with Coffee Pot might beat this record at auction in May. Auctioneer Christie’s have put an estimate of £1.2 million on the work. It is described as a rare early work by Peploe , the most famous Scottish Colourist . Four other paintings by Peploe will also be in the auction. The Singing Butler is Vettriano’s most famous and successful image . It has been published as a poster and a canvas print

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Jack Vettriano canvas prints

The Singing Butler canvas print
The Singing Butler canvas print

Jack Vettriano has published a new set of 6 canvas prints. The new set of canvas prints includes well-known images of the Singing Butler , Bluebird at Bonneville, In Thoughts of You and Dance me to the End of Love as well as the Picnic Party and the Pier. Vettriano fans are waiting for news about his new London exhibition which is scheduled for this summer . His recent exhibition in Kirkcaldy was a massive success. 46,000 people went to Kirkcaldy Museum and Art Gallery to see Jack Vettriano’s new exhibition Days of Wine and Roses.

Jack Vettriano canvas prints

Get more Jack Vettriano news and updates on Twitter and in the Photogold Facebook group

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The Look of Love poster by Jack Vettriano

The Look Of Love – Exhibition Poster
Limited Edition Exhibition Poster
32 x 24 ins   Framed size: 34.0 x 26.0 ins

Unframed: £35.00

Framed: £115.00

This limited edition poster is one of two designs that we have published to accompany the forthcoming exhibition, ‘Days of Wine and Roses’, which opened at the Kirkcaldy Museum & Art Gallery in Fife on 27th March 2010.

The posters will be available from 27th March 2010 but may be pre-ordered now.

Printed on 300gsm white essential silk board, the seven posters are available unframed or framed in a 1.2inch square cut, warm black frame with a brown highlight on the inner and outer edges. The frame has a vintage feel and was selected by the artist for the framing of his posters.

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Days of Wine and Roses poster by Jack Vettriano

Days of Wine and Roses poster

Limited Edition Exhibition Poster
32 x 24 ins   Framed size: 34.0 x 26.0 ins

The posters are available now
This limited edition poster is one of two designs  published to accompany the  exhibition, ‘Days of Wine and Roses’, which opened at the Kirkcaldy Museum & Art Gallery in Fife on 27th March 2010.
Printed on 300gsm white essential silk board, the posters are available unframed or framed in a 1.2inch square cut, warm black frame with a brown highlight on the inner and outer edges. The frame has a vintage feel and was selected by the artist for the framing of his posters.

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The Innocents by Jack Vettriano

The Innocents by Jack Vettriano , limited edition signed print
The Innocents by Jack Vettriano , limited edition signed print

The Innocents by Jack Vettriano is an early  limited edition signed print originally published in 1994  by his first publisher Corrymiller Scott in Newcastle. This limited edition print is very rare . We have one copy of this print in stock. Phone 07723-538941 for more details .

Medium:
Offset Lithograph
Published: 1994
Edition Copies: 975
Size: 20? x 24?  (51cm x 61cm)
Finish: Framed
Signed: Yes
Certificate of Authenticity: Yes
Publisher: Secondary

The Innocents by Jack Vettriano by Jack Vettriano

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Summertime Blues by Jack Vettriano

Summertime Blues by Jack Vettriano
Summertime Blues by Jack Vettriano

Summertime Blues is a Jack Vettriano limited edition print which was published in 1994 by his first publisher Corrymiller Scott in Newcastle. These limited edition prints are very rare . We have one copy of this print in stock. Phone 07723-538941 for more details

Medium:
Offset Lithograph
Published: 1994
Edition Copies: 975
Size: 20? x 24?  (51cm x 61cm)
Finish: Framed
Signed: Yes
Certificate of Authenticity: Yes
Publisher: Secondary

Summertime Blues by Jack Vettriano at Photogold art gallery. Guardian reviews

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Game On by Jack Vettriano

Speculation is mounting over the paintings including Game On which might  be featured in the Jack Vettriano exhibition which will be opening in Kirkcaldy next year . Vettriano has stated that his most famous painting The Singing Butler will be part of the exhibition  . Sotheby’s auctioneers are  helping him track down his best-known paintings, seeking loans from  collectors and anonymous buyers.
Vettriano has, somewhat optimistically ,  offered the show to the National Galleries of Scotland, which has always shunned his work.
It was “mildly short of a disgrace” that NGS had never shown or bought his work for the national collection, he said, adding: “That may be the opportunity for the National Galleries to say, ‘Right, we’ll show this stuff and let the public make their minds up’.”
Vettriano has been on tour in the UK including an  appearance at the Aberdeen Music Hall taking questions from up to 800 people. It was something he had never done before,  showing the popularity of the so-called “People’s Painter”. Game On was published as a limited Edition Giclee print , Paper: 310 gsm Hahnemuhle mould made paper

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New Terry Bradley exhibition

Artist Terry Bradley’s new exhibition shows a new side to his work .

“It’s another side to what I do — there are the heavily-tattooed men and women that I’m best known for and now there are these lighter, calmer works.

“They’ll be on display for the first time in the old Northern Bank building on Waring Street, which is a perfect setting.”

Terry painted his first canvas 14 years ago as a present, but his work is now held in private collections all over the world and fans include Madonna, The Bee Gees, Michael Flatley, Bono and Ronan Keating.

As well as famous patrons, Terry has attracted new admirers in the most unexpected place — Northern Ireland’s prisons — and he recently spent time behind bars with male and female inmates. He explains: “Earlier this year, I received an email from Magilligan Prison saying the inmates loved my work and would I have any brochures or anything I could send to them. Then I heard that a prisoner had committed suicide and decided to go and speak to them in person.
“I also went to Hydebank Women’s Prison and the inmates had pictures on the wall of their versions of my female paintings.

“Again, I just spent time talking with them about their lives, art and about why and how I do what I do. There were bare canvasses in one corner of the room and as I knew a few of the women were soon to be released, I did some drawings and gave them one each. I told them that they would be worth a few grand and that it would give them a start, or they could just keep the sketches for themselves. They really appreciated that. Meeting people like that does as much for me as it does for them. It really lifts me up. Art is a great thing. As therapy, it’s been hippie-fied a bit, but it is a very rewarding thing to do and a great way of expressing yourself.When my father died earlier this year, I received flowers from the prisoners, which was really touching.”

One of four children born and bred in the Oldpark Road area of north Belfast, Terry began his working life as a model in Dublin. He was sketching and drawing since his days at Newtownbreda High School, but a nightclub owner spotted his potential .

“In 1995, I did a piece as a present for a friend who had always looked after me when I was broke,” he recalls.

He owned a club called The Pod in Dublin and I painted a picture of all the regulars. He loved it and asked me to put on a show.

“I declined at first, but after a few more drinks, I agreed. I was astonished when it sold out and things progressed from there.”

Married to former medical photographer Ashley, who now helps him with the business side of things, Terry divides his time between homes in Kircubbin and Dublin.He admits that combining the solitary life of an artist with being dad to Zak (10), Hal (7) and Etta Blue (5) can sometimes lead to unusual living arrangements.
Although his paintings now sell for thousands of pounds, Terry insists that becoming successful was far from easy.

“Nothing comes to your door. You have to put yourself out there and get your work seen. I may be doing ok now, but it wasn’t always like that.Everyone thinks it’s a glamorous existence, but they don’t see what goes into it and the personal sacrifices.For instance, yesterday I worked all day and then all night until 4am, full-on. And I’ve been doing that for years.Yes, there are nice things I can do now, but it’s taken a long time and as well as drive, an awful lot of luck was involved.For a young artist starting out today, it’s beyond tough. I can see why people opt for illustration and computer design because you can make a decent living from that.

“I know a lot of computer designers who are resigned to being artists on the side. There are a lot of facilities available and a lot of talent out there. But the local art scene and the funding in Northern Ireland is all very closed shop, ‘who you know’ and ‘let’s not rock the boat’. It’s terrible.There isn’t any help or support for someone who is outside the ‘clique’.

Terry , much like Jack Vettriano , has had to develop a thick skin himself to deal with the snobs who look down on his unique style and self-taught status.

“Art is for everyone, but the high-brow art world tends to close itself away in rooms and have nothing to do with people on the street. I avoid that whole scene. I do what I do and freely admit I have no idea about other artists or art history. I do admire Jack Vettriano though, simply because of the way he is. His commercial success and style is sneered at by critics, yet people love his work. That’s the way I am. I’m just a guy. I do what I do and if people like my paintings and buy them, I’m over the moon.”
Terry Bradley’s new exhibition will be unveiled at a private showing in the old Northern Bank building, 2 Waring Street, Belfast, on Thursday. The exhibition then opens to the public at Eakin Gallery, Lisburn Road, until November 27 . Jack Vettriano is one of Photogold ‘s first artists