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Four new Jack Vettriano prints published

Artist Jack Vettriano has published four new limited edition prints – Morning News , Afternoon Reverie, Just the Way It Is and One Moment in Time..

Just the Way It Is is a Jack Vettriano Limited Edition Giclee Print. 

Image Size: 20 x 16.8 ins / 50.8 x 42.7cm
Framed size: 34.0 x 29.0 ins / 86 x 73cm

Published in 2012
Paper: 350 gsm Museum Etching paper
Edition Size: 250 + 25 Artist’s Proofs
Signed and numbered by the artist.

Just the Way It Is is available unframed or framed in a curved warm black/brown frame selected by the artist himself. Our unframed prints come mounted and acetate wrapped for protection.

Vettriano’s most famous image , The Singing Butler , goes on display at Aberdeen Art Gallery , Scotland or the first time in 20 years’

It is part of an exhibition entitled “From Van Gogh to Vettriano – Hidden Gems from Private Collections”.

Vettriano’s artwork became the most expensive painting by a Scottish artist when it sold for £750,000 eight years ago. The exhibition ends in April.

The Singing Butler is Vettriano’s best selling print and it has been loaned to the gallery for the exhibition by a private collector in Scotland.

In 1992 when Vettriano painted the picture and submitted it for inclusion in the Royal Academy summer show, it was rejected.

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Methil Power station is demolished

The 300ft chimney stack at Methil Power Station, Fife has been blown up – marking the demolition of the last part of the building.The iconic structure was visible for miles and featured in Jack Vettriano’s Long Time Gone.

longtime gone framed
long time gone Vettriano

Hundreds of spectators gathered to watch as the concrete structure came down.
ScottishPower, which owns the site, said that it had decided to use explosives after consulting with experts. Vettriano has paid tribute to the building , saying that it was the backdrop to many important events in his life , including his first kiss.The power station, which became operational in 1965, provided more than 1,000 jobs and generated electricity for more than 3.5 million homes before closing in 2000.